Author Topic: Tack Tube Failure and Storm Trysail Option  (Read 506 times)

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SeaGlub

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Re: Tack Tube Failure and Storm Trysail Option
« Reply #4 on: February 19, 2019, 01:17:57 PM »
I agree with everything Jay said except that when we replaced a shattered top swivel in the in mast furler we did not have the same pressure issue with the motor. Ours came off and went back on without much difficulty.

As for the trysail, we do have one and did use it on a test sail in San Francisco in 25-30 knots. It was not fun hoisting. First, we do have a spare aft halyard installed (and we have found it incredibly useful including for a windsock over the aft cabin hatch). When hoisting, especially if you don't have the luxury of other crew to help, be sure to leave the sail in the bag as much as you can. The big flaw with this integrated track in the mast is that the slugs entered well above my head which creates a large area of exposed trysail to the wind, possible disaster situation. We found it helped to leave the boat at 20-30 degrees apparent wind on the port side (same side as our integrated track) and then let the exposed sail get caught up against the boom Vang.  As for the sheets we ran two sheets tied with bowlines aft to the stern cleats. There we had attached blocks with dyneema loops but in a pinch we could have just ran the sheets thru the underside opening of the cleat. Then the sheets came forward to port and starboard winches. With this configuration we could manage the trysail both to port and to starboard by loosening one side and tightening the other. This allowed the trysail to be independent of the boom. Fortunately we've ever only used this in that test sail. Hope this helps. I'm interested in anyone elses experience when hoisting....
C&M
SeaGlub H46 #22

snailor

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Re: Tack Tube Failure and Storm Trysail Option
« Reply #3 on: February 12, 2019, 11:00:45 PM »
Thanks for your thought Jay. We had Selden send us two replacement tack tubes so we would have a spare ready to go. Our drive unit still worked fine but since our unit hadnt been serviced in 5 years we took it off and sent it to Florida Rigging and Hydraulics. They opened it up and found a crack in the motor mount. They've welded it back together but still nervous it not as strong as before. Waiting to see what a new housing would cost - yes I'm sitting down.

Wish me luck.

Cheers,
Eric

jay

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Re: Tack Tube Failure and Storm Trysail Option
« Reply #2 on: December 07, 2018, 04:25:09 PM »
Eric
I did the same thing, with our old 46 a number of years ago.  The main had a wrap up top, and I just put too much pressure on the roller furling, and the sleeve snapped.  I did get a new sleeve from Selden, and replaced the part myself.  It is not a job to do away from the marina, however. I do remember talking to the Selden guys a couple times during the repair. You do have to take the motor off the mast, which is part of the difficult aspects of the job.  As I remember, we didn't unhook the electrical, but let it just hang below next to the mast. ( I also had two other guys there helping, and one was an engineer.)
Important though, is to put a couple of tie downs around the motor that have the mechanical type of cinch down straps, before you take the motor off.  It tends to pop off big time as there is some pressure there.  Also, these straps are critical when you go to put the motor back on.  You cant put enough pressure to do it by hand, to get it back in place. The only other difficult thing I remember, is getting a cotter pin put in the new sleeve.  This for sure, took an extra set of hands.   
I never did have this happen again, but I was a bit more careful while furling after.  When the main gets hung up (and it will eventually), I use more outhaul, and sometimes go back in and out a couple of times. It seems that when I'm more careful while furling, prevents most issues unfurling. If furling with the boom sheeted out, it will tend to wrap at the top of the mast, which is where most issues happen.  Before furling I point the boat high, with just a little pressure in the main, boom sheeted in so main goes in even, slight pressure on outhaul, and be sure your wrapping it in the mast the right way.
Anyway, that's what I do, but there may be others with a better system.  Hope this helps.
Jay
HY 56#12

snailor

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Tack Tube Failure and Storm Trysail Option
« Reply #1 on: December 07, 2018, 03:44:29 AM »
Near the end of our fall cruise on the Chesapeake we sheared the tack tube on our Selden in-mast furling unit, which we have on our H-46.  For those of you with this system, the tack tube is a short (2-ft) extrusion with an adjusting screw that connects the in-mast furling mandrel to the electric drive unit.  in our case, our electric drive unit was working fine and our mandrel and mainsail were fine.  They just no longer had anything connecting them. No amount of turning the gearbox with the manual handle would do anything to wind the main back into the mast which we really needed to do as we entered harbor.  Instead, we had to anchor the boat, pull the vertical battens and drop the sail to the deck until we had things figured out.  Long story short we were able to sleeve the two halves of the tube together with a short length of galvanized pipe and get sailing again.  It took two months to get the replacement tube(s) and I ordered two of them just to have a spare. However, I'm still sailing on the jury rig for the moment. For those of you who have not experienced this failure or even contemplated it, you may want to consider ordering this part or having some kind of spare on board and the knowhow to change it out.  Selden told me that this part is engineered to fail in advance of all the other system components which are even harder to fix. In essence it is the weak-link fuse. Ours was 17 years old when it went.

The point of this story is it lays bare the vulnerability of the in-mast furling system to this type of failure, which if it happens at sea during an approaching blow it could have dire consequences because its not the kind of repair that would be easy to make in a seaway.  At this point, I'm thinking of having a storm trysail made for the boat so that if this happens again - especially at sea in rough weather - I could still drop the main and raise the trysail on the integrated track on the mast so we'd still have something to balance the headsail somewhat in order to keep the boat under control.  The trysail would be constructed to withstand winds up to 50+ knots but of course would not be very fast in light air. I shudder at the thought of having to do all of this in rough conditions but it might be our only option if conditions were going to get really bad - we'd have to reduce sail.

My question is have any of the other 46s, 44s or 49s rigged storm trysails using Selden's integrated spare track (its next to the in-mast furling slot) and if so how did they route the tack, sheets and halyard since there is not a spare main halyard standard on our boat. I'd also be curious to know how many of those with these sails have actually used them or have they remained buried in the bottom of the lazarette unused?  Otherwise, I'm thinking of alternatives for to how to deal with a broken tack tub at sea.

Thanks,
Eric Powers
S/V Santosha H-46 #34

 

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