Author Topic: Looking to fulfill a safety requirement  (Read 703 times)

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joel

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Re: Looking to fulfill a safety requirement
« Reply #10 on: August 04, 2017, 01:50:56 PM »
I zip tied the board with the pump to the binnacle guard.  (The table had been removed for the race).

It threw off the compass, so be careful where you mount it.

Aria49

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Re: Looking to fulfill a safety requirement
« Reply #9 on: August 03, 2017, 08:59:48 PM »
I received the answer from ARC;
(I hope they don't mind me posting this)

Hi Brian.

It is a problem we come across with other centre cockpit boats (HRs especially). You have to assume that the electric pumps will fail, hence the requirement for manual. In the event of a fire, gas leak or serious flooding it may not be safe to pump from below decks. Hence the on-deck requirement.

How most centre-cockpit boats get over this design issue is to make up a portable pump, mounted either onto a flat board, or better still on to a board cut to fit as a wash-board. Add a long hose and you then have an emergency pump that can be used on deck.

I hope this helps
.

This makes sense to me, not hard to set up either.

Brian Stork
Aria H49 (#30)
Aria49  #30

Aria49

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Re: Looking to fulfill a safety requirement
« Reply #8 on: August 01, 2017, 04:10:27 PM »
I have asked the ARC people regarding the cockpit manual bilge, no response yet. Sounds like the pump mounted on a board is the easiest if they give no waiver.  Ill post when I hear from them.
We are refitting the boat this winter and will definitely check in to the things I've read in this thread regarding the existing pumps. 
Thanks

Brian Stork
S/V Aria
Hylas 49 (#30)     
Aria49  #30

RichardIcowl

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Looking to fulfill a safety requir
« Reply #7 on: July 14, 2017, 07:58:29 AM »
I'm looking to play this weekend in Lexington for the firecracker. I can play 1st 2nd or 3rd. If anyone is looking for a player give me a call or shoot me a text 803682-5877

CabezonBD

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Re: Looking to fulfill a safety requirement
« Reply #6 on: June 14, 2017, 05:22:23 AM »
Thanks all for your response.....I will play it by ear and hope that the lower manual pump will suffice.

Merrill......there's still sign up room. You guys know the ARC family.

tbglynn

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Re: Looking to fulfill a safety requirement
« Reply #5 on: June 12, 2017, 04:28:50 PM »


Our 44/45.5 was set up with only a check valve on the primary bilge pump.  The exit is above the waterline, but when the boat is healed, not so much.  The high bilge pump empties through a manifold (which also has the shower drain pumps) that has an anti-siphon valve and pumps out through a thru hull under water.  This primary bilge pump (we use a Rule 1500) arrangement relying on a check valve is in my view problematic if not unsafe.  We replaced the hose (it was time anyway), the check valve, the strainer and then ran the hose high up on the port side of the hull behind the aft lavatory cabinetry and installed an anti-siphon valve.  I'm planning to install a Beckson deck plate in the cabinetry so that I can more easily inspect and maintain the anti-siphon valve.

We have a Rule 3200 pump with a 12 foot hose and 12 foot battery cable with clips whose purpose is similar to Andy's sump pump.  With head pressure we think it only moves about 2000 gallons an hour (equivalent to what they say the inflow is from a two inch hole below the waterline), but you can put it anywhere and move a lot of water.  That's my real emergency bilge pump. 

Like everyone else, we haven't figured out how to mount a 30 GPH manual pump in the cockpit, nor would I if I could think of a way to do it. We have a Whale Gusher 10 mounted in the engine room, close to the companionway.  Since I sail shorthanded I'm not sure who's going to be pumping that thing while I'm scrambling around trying to stop water from coming in the boat so I have a low opinion of it.

In defense of having the higher capacity pump as primary, I did once have a problem on passage shipping a lot of water (a lot) through the rudder packing gland.  We were getting frequent high bilge alarms because, with the boat laid over, the switch for the primary was not sensing the depth of the water in the sump.  By jumping out the switch, I was able to run the primary constantly which nicely controlled the flooding, and then go back to sleep.  If it had been the other way around, the primary would never have been able to keep up.

Tim Glynn
s/v Egraine
hull #84


Knoxan

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Re: Looking to fulfill a safety requirement
« Reply #4 on: June 11, 2017, 04:22:28 PM »
True Brew H46#32 while under previous ownership entered the ARC and was given dispensation to rely on the manual bilge pump mounted below decks - Port side of engine compartment. Not sure how that came about but the owner at the time told me about it during handover from him.

Incidentally, while sailing recently on a starboard tack I was alarmed to find the bilge was rapidly filling with water coming back up through the main electric bilge pump discharge hose. The NRV was evidently stuck in the open position and the electric pump impeller was seized with bilge detritus. Dropped sail to get on an even keel to get the outlet above water level and cleared problem. Pity no isolating valve.

On reflection, I believe my bilge pumping system needs review, The back up pump which is positive displacement and hence low flow operates at a high bilge level, and the high capacity centrifugal pump operates at a low level. These should probably be the other way around and I will change over the level switches over to put this into effect. Perhaps this is unique to True Brew and is simply a wiring mistake by someone rather than by design.
Hopefully never have to try it out but I carry onboard a 2000gph portable sump pump  to run from the generator provided I can fire it up before too much flooding. Comes with 2" flexible flat hose. Cost about $100.

Andy

Ambition

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Re: Looking to fulfill a safety requirement
« Reply #3 on: June 11, 2017, 03:08:03 PM »
Patrick,
There was the same requirement when we did the Arc Caribbean last fall and there was no way to permanently install a manual bilge pump operated from the cockpit. Our centre cockpit boats do not  lend themselves to that installation. Finally the rally inspector waved the requirement for us. 
The solution I almost took was to buy the Edson Emergency Pop Kit - http://www.edsonmarine.com/newproducts/pump_kit.php but I balked at the US$1200 price tag.

Cheers
Merrill and Maryse
S/V Ambition Hylas 46 #40

joel

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Re: Looking to fulfill a safety requirement
« Reply #2 on: June 10, 2017, 10:11:19 PM »
We mounted one on a board and had a hose long enough to reach the bilge. That met the offshore racing rules.

CabezonBD

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Looking to fulfill a safety requirement
« Reply #1 on: June 10, 2017, 05:39:25 PM »
Hello, we have entered the World ARC 2019. We have a number of safety requirements to satisfy. One of the safety requirements is that we have a manual bilge pump mounted for pumping handle use on deck or in the cockpit. Does anyone here have such an arrangement? We do have one mounted below deck but that does not meet the requirement. We have a 2006 H49 #53. I think routing the 1 1/2 hose will be the biggest challenge. Thanks in advance for any suggestions.

Patrick Miller
sv Hope
H49 #53

 

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