Author Topic: Hylas 44 repower  (Read 4911 times)

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brian black

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Re: Hylas 44 repower
« Reply #12 on: June 11, 2019, 06:05:30 PM »
re newer Yanmar designs, electronic and common rail . . .
I was told by a Yanmar technician that these engines won´t run properly on the  higher-sulfur fuel still common in most of the world, particularly third-world.  So if you´re planning to cruise there . . .

Schafe01

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Re: Hylas 44 repower
« Reply #11 on: June 10, 2019, 01:45:55 PM »
I re-powered my Hylas 42 in 2017 with a new Yanmar 4JH57.  I was able to remove the old Yanmar by cutting a small part of the engine access door baseboard to allow clearance for the oil pan (needed 2 inches).  I found this easier then removing the sink and surrounding woodwork.  Had a top cap built which covers the incision behind the ladder.

Had the yard crane out the old Yanmar 4JH54TE and crane in the new 4JH57.  There is very little clearance with the main hatch.  Also had the yard replace the prop shaft, cutless bearing and install a drip less seal.

I did all the engine removal / install work.  Had a local Yanmar tech check the installation and alignment before startup.  The new Yanmar was a very close drop in replacement for the old engine.

The 4JH57 is a fantastic engine, always starts a a touch of the button, very clean running and fuel efficient.  Hylas is currently in Mexico and the engine now has over 400 hours.

I would estimate it took me around 50 hours to pull and replace the engine by myself.   Yanmar dealers don’t like just selling an engine ... I had to leverage the Distributor just to get the order placed.  I paid $13,900 for the new engine (List was over $18K) plus tax.  Yard costs for crane, haulout and propshaft work was around $2,000).  Figure another $1K for misc install parts.

Dealers wanted around $38K to do the replacement (not counting the prop shaft).  My total cost was under $20K (including the shaft / install).

On the downside, Yanmar provides very little documentation or support.

Steve
Shooting Star
H-42 # 10

wurzner

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Re: Hylas 44 repower
« Reply #10 on: June 10, 2019, 12:10:40 PM »
Many sources have told my my 4jh-bte (77hp) should be good for 20,000 hrs if not abused.  I haven't moored too much since I bought it, but it runs perfect.  It did have the injection pump rebuilt which I heard you should do every 4-5 thousand hours, or sooner? I had to because it wouldn't start, but is a really nice runner now (knock on wood).  A proper rebuild would have to be~$10k and a repwer ~30+?  My Ericson 38 was $18k, with a 2nd quote for 22k.  A 75-100hp must coat a small fortune.

floatplan

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Re: Hylas 44 repower
« Reply #9 on: August 04, 2015, 07:30:07 PM »
Norm (and Andy),

Thanks so much for the detailed reply!  Sounds like you made a wise decision.  Thank you too Andy! After reading both your posts we are feeling much more confident about our engine with its' 3000 engine hours and no major problems (knock on wood)!  We love our Hylas 44 having bought her in 1990 when the previous owner decided he wanted a bigger Hylas.  Norm, we have been struck by lightening twice while onboard.  Fortunately, we suffered no hull damage but lost all our instrumentation both times. 

Greg and Sylvia Boehmer
H44-58 Pigeon Toes IV

Norm

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Re: Hylas 44 repower
« Reply #8 on: August 04, 2015, 06:06:42 PM »
Hi Greg, Sylvia, and Andy,
I did repower my 44 with a Beta 60 (based on a Kubota diesel). I did all the work on my own, and spent about 200 hours total, probably 50 of that due to my own inexperience (so I had to figure out how to do everything), and 25 due to the fact that every single nut and bolt on the Perkins 4-154 was corroded and frozen. Plus I did the work in the winter, with the temp in the cabin as low as 6 degrees. I am not sure I would do it again! My favorite boatworking tools became a Sawzall and a 4.5 inch grinder...
Everything in the drive train is now brand new from the raw water strainer to the aft tip of the prop shaft, with the exception of the feathering prop. New wiring, fuel hoses, exhaust hoses, waterlock muffler, transom exhaust fitting, engine mounts, steel engine beds, flexible prop coupler, dripless shaft seal, prop shaft, shift/throttle mechanism and cables, instrument panel, and transmission. Nearly all of a different size from the Perkins, and all on the opposite side of the engine.
A few things:
1. I could not figure out why the 44 displaced only 22320 lbs per specs, when it is clearly heavily built - possibly overbuilt (hull thickness of 2.25 inches solid glass found when replacing cockpit drain through-hulls, cockpit coaming 3/4" thick, etc.). I have the original plans from German Frers, and found that his drawn waterline is 5" lower than the actual waterline (I already knew my shoal draft boat drew about 5'4", not 4'11", but thought that might be the keel casting). Calculating pounds per inch immersion, that gives an actual displacement of about 30,000 lbs. Thus the Beta 60 instead of the 50.
2. The fiberglass engine beds (on top of which sit the steel weldments that the flexible mounts attach to) were grossly misaligned in the vertical angle, so I had to design and have built new weldments.
3. The original exhaust design was crazy, and totaled 27 feet in length, probably one of the reasons the Perkins overheated rapidly at high speeds. I was able to put in a system of larger diameter hose that totaled 17 feet in length.
4. To get the engine out, I removed the galley sinks, countertops, hot water heater, water pump, and forward engine room bulkheads (sounds worse than it was), so that the engine could be swung forward, rotated 180 degrees, and pulled up out of the companionway at a 45 degree angle, with 1/2" clearance. Procedure reversed for the new Beta. Received $18.00 for the Perkins at the recycling yard (600 lbs at $.03/lb.)

Having done all this, the new engine is a delight. Much smoother and quieter than the Perkins (not hard to do...). Effortlessly cruises the boat at 7.2 knots at 2100 RPM. As part of the engine testing, I ran it at top speed (2700 RPM), boat speed 8.5 knots, for 15 minutes with no smoke and the engine temperature never exceeding 175 degrees. Outstanding customer support/advice/encouragement from Beta.

I still feel I did the right thing by not getting the new, common rail, computer controlled Yanmar. Yet another friend of mine had his boat struck by lightning a few weeks ago.

Regarding whether this needed to be done: the Perkins was failing and becoming unreliable, much corrosion and rust, heat exchanger held together with JB Weld and fiberglass tape, oil pressure slowly dropping, etc. It was the Japanese version, with increasingly difficult (or no) parts availability.
However, if my diesel had been well maintained, was running well, started easily with little or no smoke, and showed little rust or corrosion, I would have kept it. I have heard of lots of diesels going 10,000 hours without overhaul, and one (yes, a Perkins 4-154) with 22,500 hours on it.
Norm

YachtShah

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Re: Hylas 44 repower
« Reply #7 on: August 04, 2015, 01:18:50 AM »
Hello Greg and Sylvia,

I have H44 # 65 1989.  I've been considering my 4JHTE recently, which has done more than 7000 hours.  It has had one rebuild, though the cylinders were not bored out as all looked good after 12 years.  I will have it rebuilt again within a few years.  But I cannot see a particular reason to replace it.  On the boat, I generally find that the old stuff last for longer, and the new stuff is built to a price, and designed to fail.

I wonder what are the experiences of those that have made the investment - was it worth the cost and trouble to repower??

Andy Alford
Andy Alford, Yacht SHAH, Hylas 44, Hull 65, 1989 - currently cruising Borneo, Philippines and Indonesia

floatplan

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Re: Hylas 44 repower
« Reply #6 on: July 31, 2015, 02:03:20 PM »
Hello Norm,

Hopefully, you are still around!  We own a Hylas 44 #58.  Our current engine is Yanmar 4jhte with 3000 engine hours.  We are not experiencing any issues currently but we are planning an ICW trip and considering repowering.  Have you chosen your replacement engine for your Hylas 44 yet?

Regards,
Greg and Sylvia Boehmer

Norm

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Re: Hylas 44 repower
« Reply #5 on: November 20, 2014, 12:45:23 AM »
Hi Jim,
I was looking for a Yanmar 4JH5E, which I beleive is the successor to your engine, but was told by Mack Boring that it is no longer made, and has been replaced by the 4JH57, a brand new (in production about 3 months), common rail design that is completely electronically controlled. I actually put a deposit on it at the Annapolis boat show, but ran into Nigel Calder later in the day, and asked him about the engine. He said that it would likely be smoother, quieter, get better mileage, and run better at lower speeds, but that if your boat is hit by lightning, you have no engine since the electronics will likely be fried. I have several friends whose boats have been hit, one twice. Losing depthfinders and GPS's is one thing, losing a functioning engine is another. I am also very leery about buying a newly designed engine so early in it's production run. BTW, the dealer said that within one to two years, all Yanmars will be electronically controlled.
I am now considering a Beta 50.
Norm

Obsession

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Re: Hylas 44 repower
« Reply #4 on: November 20, 2014, 12:13:33 AM »
Norm,

It is a 4jh4ae  It is a non turbo 54 hp engine.  It runs at 3100 max and cruises about 2700.  Smooth and easy to bleed.  Just turn the ignition on and it self bleeds if you need it.  Check on the web for the stats.  We did it in 2006 and it has been running flawlessly since.  have about 600 hrs on it.  Mack Boring is the dist. 

Norm

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Re: Hylas 44 repower
« Reply #3 on: November 20, 2014, 12:09:11 AM »
Thanks, Jim. I am not familiar with the Yanmar 4jae - what is the horsepower? - it sounds like you are satisfied with it.
Norm

Obsession

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Re: Hylas 44 repower
« Reply #2 on: November 19, 2014, 04:43:20 PM »
Norm,

We did this from a Yanmar 4jhte to a 4jhae.  Much better engine.  The yard dismantled the engine to the basic as you discussed.  It came out the side down the chute between the engine room and the  galley and out he companionway.  They used a prop shaft and a chain on the engine to slide it to the companionway.  They did not have to remove any of the cabinetry etc.  

Of course,  we had to redo the transmission added a little shaft length with a spacer and repitched the prop blades.  Much better engine.   Glad we did it.  

Jim Halter

Norm

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Hylas 44 repower
« Reply #1 on: November 19, 2014, 03:04:21 PM »
The time has come to replace the decrepit Perkins 4.154 in my 44. Has anyone done this? I would be interested in hearing how the engine was removed and the new one installed. I see three options:
 1. raise the engine (after removing all possible parts - heat exchanger, intake manifold, transmission, etc.), move it sideways towards the galley, then forward to the companionway, and lift it out with a chain hoist to the boom. A major issue is that it will need to be lifted above the countertop level in the galley to be moved forward since it will not fit between the engine room and the cabinetry below the counter.
2. Remove the cabinetry, sinks, etc. forward of the engine, raise the engine and move it straight forward to the companionway, and
3. cut out the cockpit sole and lift the engine straight up through the cockpit.

I have removed and replaced a similar weight engine on another boat successfully, but it was not buried so deeply inside the boat as in the Hylas.

One other question -   in doing the horsepower/gear ratio/propeller calculations for the new engine, the displacement of the boat is a critical consideration. I know the published displacement of the 44 is 22,320 lbs, which is quite light for a cruising boat of this size. I can't see where weight was saved compared to other cruising boats, so I wonder if anyone knows the true displacement (or is the 22,320 approximately correct?). I have been using 25,000 lbs as a guesstimate.
Thanks,
Norm
H44-29   Blue Moon

 

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