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Hylas Discussion / Hylas 46 for sale - Adina #70
« Last post by Tom Partridge on October 23, 2017, 12:13:11 PM »
Adina, our 2008/9 Hylas 46 is for sale. Full details of her can be found on our website www.yachtadina.co.uk. We're proud she was given a glowing report in the October 2017 edition of Yachting Monthly scoring 5 stars for 'Offshore Passage Making" (http://www.yachtingmonthly.com/reviews/yacht-reviews/hylas-46-review). The asking price is GBP 320 000 (USD 421 000). Please contact tompartridge@yachtadina.co.uk if you are interested in viewing her.

Adina was built at the end of 2008 as a 2009 model, fitted out for long distance blue water cruising. Based in the Solent, she was lightly used by her first owners before their circumstances changed. We took ownership in June 2012 and continued to keep her in the Solent. In March 2013 we left our home port with the aim to sail Adina around the world. Having initially sailed to the Caribbean, we returned there in March 2017 crossing our track, and completing our trip. We shipped Adina back to the UK and she is now based in the Hamble River on the south coast of England. Further details of our trip can be found on www.yachtadina.co.uk

Adina is an extraordinary vessel who has always performed and kept us safe in true comfort. We lived by the rule that if we looked after her she would look after us. We are proud of the way we have maintained her and many have commented favourably on the excellent condition she is in. Adina is in top order and ready to set sail again with new owners. We would dearly love for her to have caring owners.

Yachting Monthly (Chris Beeson, October 2017):
 “ADINA is the first Hylas I’ve tested and the workmanship and attention to detail are as good as anything I’ve ever seen… The numbers showed that Frers has given her a hull that is as slippy as it is good-looking… The stemhead fitting is a stainless steel work of industrial art. Headroom is 6ft 5in and the teak joinery and walnut-topped fixed table is lit beautifully by two large windows either side, two forward, two opening hatches in the deckhead, two hull ports and a small opening port to starboard… She’s a tried and tested, turnkey solution for comfortable ocean cruising.” “Build quality throughout is exceptional and she’s been well maintained.”
“‘A round-the-world trip has its own rule of thirds,’ says Tom, ‘sailing, sightseeing and maintenance.’ Fortunately Adina is designed with this in mind. Everything is labelled, from seacocks to wiring, and everything has excellent access: engine, generator, PSS seal, fuel and water manifolds. All the stainless steel tanks are fitted with inspection hatches. Her designer appreciates the importance of maintenance.”
“As blue water cruisers go, she’s really quite rewarding to helm… You’ll be happy sailing alone. With electric winches, furling and bow thruster, she’s easily managed and confidence will come from that. When you want to invite guests, the appointments in their ensuite cabin will keep them very comfortable, the galley is kitted out with everything you need to entertain and the saloon is highly convivial. Just make sure your guests have booked a return flight or they’ll never leave.”
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Hylas Discussion / Re: Hylas 49 intermediate stay furling system
« Last post by joel on October 19, 2017, 08:52:47 PM »
SeaGlub,
What brand/model of furler are you looking at?  Asym furlers use a torsion rope but I have not seen a jib furler with a flexible track. 
Just curious!
Joel
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Hylas Discussion / Re: Hylas 49 intermediate stay furling system
« Last post by NordicSunII on October 19, 2017, 01:46:58 PM »
I have a hylas 44 hull #3 and I considering putting a roller furler on the inner stay.  I see S/V Penn Station another 44 has a roller and it is removable.  I think this would be a good arrangement to get it out of the way when not needed.  Here are a  of pictures that might help show this:

https://www.facebook.com/665590446859816/photos/a.665599413525586.1073741828.665590446859816/819818168103709/?type=3&theater
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Hylas Discussion / Re: Washdown - Fresh and Salt Water
« Last post by Ambition on October 19, 2017, 12:25:44 PM »
Andy,
Thank you very much for the detailed response. I believe that my solution will be not to complicate the existing installation but to add a unique fitting for the fresh water wash down in the anchor locker along side the salt water wash down.

Thanks
Merrill
s/v Ambition H46 #40
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Hylas Discussion / Hylas 49 for sale Manketti #47
« Last post by Manketti on October 19, 2017, 11:09:40 AM »
Hi all
 
We are reluctantly selling Manketti our Hylas 49 #47 2005.  She is in ready to go condition after going through an extensive 3 year refit in preparation for our round the world voyage. Almost everything is 2014 or newer;  for example in 2017 alone she received a new Hydrovane steering system, a new Spectra water maker and a new main sail;  all the electronics were replaced in 2015/16 and we also up graded the solar and wind instruments in 2016  (this is one of two with CE marking and is a European fit). 
 
We are asking £349k, (GBP) which is fairly firm.  If interested you can see the full spec and many pictures on her own web site at www.hylas49-manketti.co.uk  or email me at derek.manning@talk21.com for a pdf of the inventory.  if you wish to call me direct please call +447768905418
 
Derek Manning
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Hylas Discussion / Re: Washdown - Fresh and Salt Water
« Last post by YachtShah on October 16, 2017, 02:10:13 AM »
When I refitted my H44 more than 10 years ago, I was advised to have a salt water deckwash outlet at bow and stern - great advice.  One outlet for anchor wash and another for fish catch or general wash.  Good advise. 

I installed a single pump, through a single thru-hull with a manifold in the engine room with two isolation valves for each of the long hose runs going forward and back.  On deck, I used the valve sealing Perko Auto Sealing Deck Fitting.  And a Three Way Vavle on the inlet, either from Salt Water or from the Fresh Water Manifold.

Then I have an outlet at the stern also from the Fresh Water system (with a thermostatic valve) so that is used for my general daily shower.  (I live in the tropics so a shower downstairs is pretty sweaty.)

And then I have a 5', 25' an 50' hose with attachments so that I can go anywhere.

All quite complicated!

When I do the next refit, I will install a completely separate deckwash pump in the anchor locker, with it's own separate salt water feed and remove the long pipe going right through the inside of the boat with 60psi salt water in it!  It has split more than three times, with a super-fine spray - not at all what you want.  I will probably T off the forward head thru hull for this inlet.

If I were to do it all again, I would put the main deckwash pump in an aft locker (the portside fuel locker probably) so that it might get damaged by salt water itself, but at least it wouldn't damage anything else.  I am amazed that anyone thought it was a good idea to put a 60psi salt water pump in the main engine room.  I have never had a fitting come off (fortunately) but it would be a disaster if it did.  These days, these pumps are so cheap that the service kits are almost the same price as a discount pump.  I try to install quick fittings on my pumps now, and have a spare so a change is a relatively quick process.

I am glad that I have put the fresh water inlet to the high pressure pump, but I use it for the strangest things - not what I originally expected. 

1. Yes, once there was a cockroach infestation after an Asian hardstand.  And so I pumped 500 litres of high pressure water through the bilges of the boat. 
2. When trying to identify a leak in the Yanmar heat exchanger, I have plumbed the deckwash into the system and let it run to full pressure (with fresh water) to identify the reverse flush the system and identify the source of the leak.
3. Washing the rigging, a long hose up to the masthead once
4. The most common use though is washing through the anchor locker and bilges.  I have not been to a Marina for 3-4 years now, so this is the only way to keep the boat smelling nice.

So I would say it has been useful.  But when I wash the stainless after a salty sailing day, I use two buckets one soapy water with a sponge, immediately followed by another fresh water bucket with a chamois.  I was taught that by superyacht crew - never let the soap dry on your stainless.  Works well.

My two peneth.

Andy
Shah H44-65 1989
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Hylas Discussion / Re: Washdown - Fresh and Salt Water
« Last post by curtandkt on October 11, 2017, 05:40:57 AM »
Hi Again,

Aurora has both a fresh water and raw water valved wash down outlets in the anchor locker on the upper Starboard bulkhead. I've got coiled plastic hoses with nozzles on both. The fresh water is tapped into the boat's fresh water system by the front sink. The raw water has its own thru-hull, filter and pump. We use the raw water wash down all the time on the anchor. We don't use the fresh water hose much at all. But sometimes it is nice to give the boat a fresh water wash after a wet salty crossing. I'm west coast and in the Pacific Northwest right now. I think your in a location the fresh water wash down might be more useful. Having a water maker is wonderful and extends where and how long you can go. We have dive gear and a dive compressor on board and love to dive. So we go through a lot of fresh water when actively diving.We use the aft shower for washing the dive gear. That's the two cents from Aurora, happy sailing.

Curtis and Katie
S/V Aurora Hylas 46 #41
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Hylas Discussion / Re: Hurricane Damage
« Last post by joel on October 10, 2017, 02:00:19 PM »
Alex,
Sorry to hear about the damage!
You might contact Jordan Yachts in Lauderdale for recommendations.  They've sold a lot of Hylas' over the years.  When we bought Atlantis from them they hooked me up with an awesome electrician who fixed a bunch of stuff quickly and reasonably.

Joel
Atlantis
Hylas 44 #66
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Hylas Discussion / Re: Washdown - Fresh and Salt Water
« Last post by Ambition on October 10, 2017, 01:35:16 PM »
Jim and Pat,
Great to hear back from you. Yes it was Dominica that we met. Hope all is good with you and Capers made with through this years "active" hurricane season without issue. We stored in Antigua and all is good.
I like your idea of two completely separate systems - perhaps then I could choose a better location than the anchor locker for the fresh water wash down hose connection as well. Food for thought.

Cheers and hope ur paths cross again this winter. We are signed up to spend a lot of time in Barbuda to help with the relief effort there.
Merrill and Maryse
S/V Ambition H46 #40
ambitionh46.blogspot.com
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Hylas Discussion / Re: Washdown - Fresh and Salt Water
« Last post by Ripple on October 10, 2017, 01:22:09 PM »
Hi Merrill and Maryse,

Seems like forever since we met you in, as I recall, Dominica. We only use the saltwater wash for the anchor so it has a short hose attached to the valved outlet in the anchor locker. We installed a second valve in the locker connected to the cold water supply for the forward shower. We wash the boat using this connection, a long hose and a hose-end dispenser filled with vinegar. We tried using the salt dissolving soaps sold in stores but they left a somewhat slippery film and were less effective in removing the salt, in our opinion.

Jim and Pat Ripple
sv Capers h46-53
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